Monthly Archives: April 2015

Why Apple’s 2015 website feels like a classic 50s direct response letter

1930s Man Newspaper Reporter Wearing Hat Typing Smoking Cigar

I was chatting to Paul Lindsell, Creative Director of the excellent Space01 agency, yesterday and he was telling me how he’s banned his website team from using Lorem Ipsum when they’re putting a new site together. (Lorem Ipsum is the pretend latin type that we use to show where words go on a rough layout.)

Why? Because if they’re using Lorem Ipsum  it means the team aren’t focusing on the site’s messaging. They’re only focusing on the design. So he insists they use real customer-facing copy propositions at all times to ensure that the communications hierarchy is in place right from the start. The don’t have to insert finally crafted headlines at this stage, but they have to be in the ballpark.

This is a great idea.

Far too many sites are driven by design and technological or navigation considerations rather than by the clients’ marketing and communications objectives. Let’s have a slider, they’re groovy! Let’s have the main navigation at the side rather than the top! Cool! What are the headlines going to say? Who cares! It’s just content! Woohoo!

I really, really wish I was exaggerating here.

And it’s this aspect of website creation, more than anything else, that separates the men from the boys in the digital world.

The real smart operators understand that a website is no different from any other marketing medium.

It has to offer the visitor a clear hierarchy of benefits from the moment they land – be useful, solve problems, offer a deal, give advice. And so on.

And that’s one of the reasons that, quite remarkably, the most successful websites are starting to resemble old-fashioned direct response marketing pieces. No, really…

The Apple site is a perfect example.

I was reading up on their new Photos app, that’s replacing its current iPhoto offering (hooray!). The page is put together in a way that’s spookily reminiscent of a classic direct mail letter that could have been written in the 1950s…

It starts with a clear benefit-led headline and follows up with paragraph after paragraph leading with secondary benefits, supported by explanatory copy, relevant pictures and live interactive examples. All there on the page. No links away.

They even use what I call classic ‘You can…’ headlines:

Make an edit

Perfect your best shots

Take control of the finest details

What’s more, because everyone with a proper direct response background knows that the worst thing you can do is make your marketing look like advertising, the page is designed to look and feel like editorial.

Because there are no links away, you start at the top and read to the end; convinced you want the product. And, guess what, there’s the call to action, right at the bottom, just like on that 50s DM letter. Complete with Act Right Now message – Start using Photos on your Mac today –  and the only link on the page, naturally taking you to the App Store.

Warms the cockles of a direct response copywriter’s heart.

Here’s the page: Apple Photos

 

Whatever happened to the digital advertising revolution?

images

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. (As Pete Townshend of The Who once wrote.)

Do you remember how, a few short years ago, all the self-styled digital advertising gurus were telling everyone how advertising had changed beyond all recognition? How advertising was no longer about intrusive spots on TV and big attention-grabbing press ads? How our customers were now ‘in control’ and how we had to ‘engage’ them in ‘conversations’ via social media? How it was all about building your customers’ relationship with The Brand not about selling stuff to them?

Well, I was just on YouTube. And before I could watch my selected video I had to watch a 30 second commercial for Marks & Spencers. Just like the ones on the TV. Selling me stuff. I had no choice. Not only that, advertisers can now choose to allow their ads to interrupt videos – get shown in the middle. Again, just like telly!

And then I had a quick browse on Facebook to see what interesting stuff had been posted on my newsfeed. Oh look, lots of very old-fashioned press-style ads interrupting my enjoyment of dogs playing musical instruments and such like. (This is the same Facebook which, if you cast your mind back before it was sold, promised never to have ads on it.) Selling me stuff.

Whilst I was on Facebook did I stop to engage with my tinned tomatoes supplier? Did I dive into a fascinating conversation with Colgate about my choice of toothpaste? Did I then whizz over to Twitter to join a national debate on Lloyds Bank? Er, no I didn’t. Because nobody ever does. Do you?

In short, here’s where we are. Right back where we started. People selling stuff via what is, to all intents and purposes, traditional, intrusive, in-your-face advertising.

Facebook and Google (owners of Youtube) and Twitter have finally realised that nothing has changed. Whatsoever. People have no interest in products or brands. So you have to ram advertising down their throats whether they like it or not. (Not being the operative word, of course.)

And so, to reach your customers effectively, and cost-effectively, you run old-fashioned ads. Telly ads on YouTube, press ads on Facebook. Editorial-style banners on websites. PPC ads on Google.

Sure, there’s a bit of ‘engagement’ by fans of certain products. I engage with stuff that is relevant to my job and my hobbies. Stuff that provides me with interesting or useful information. If it happens to be provided by a brand, fine. If it doesn’t, also fine. This is PR in action. Just like it’s always been PR in action. Putting interesting stories into media that their customers read/visit. This is not new, folks.

But the idea that most people now go online to have ‘a conversation’ about toilet paper or sprouts or pan scrubs or fish fingers – or any of the countless other brands we buy every week – is as ludicrous now as it has always been. And always will be.

We don’t get fooled again, as Uncle Pete said. Or do we?